How Power States Influence the Persuasiveness of Top-Dog Versus Underdog Appeal

Drawing on power literature and research in top dog vs. underdog appeals, this research demonstrates that high- (low-) power individuals respond more positively to underdog (top dog) appeals because showing support for underdog (top-dog) brands facilitates power expression (restoration). Further, this effect was moderated by hard vs. soft sales strategy.



Citation:

Liyin Jin and Yunhui Huang (2017) ,"How Power States Influence the Persuasiveness of Top-Dog Versus Underdog Appeal", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45, eds. Ayelet Gneezy, Vladas Griskevicius, and Patti Williams, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 692-693.

Authors

Liyin Jin, Fudan University, China
Yunhui Huang, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 45 | 2017



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