Compensatory Contagion: a Psychological Defense Against Threat

This research shows that contagion can serve an underlying defensive function. We find that people respond to self-esteem threat by augmenting preference for objects that have come into contact with a celebrity who is unrelated to the threatened domain--an effect we call compensatory contagion.



Citation:

Justin McManus, Sean Hingston, Peter Darke, and Theodore Noseworthy (2016) ,"Compensatory Contagion: a Psychological Defense Against Threat", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 558-559.

Authors

Justin McManus, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada
Sean Hingston, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada
Peter Darke, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada
Theodore Noseworthy, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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