Virtue in Vice: Benefits of Conspicuous Consumption For the Powerless

Lacking power motivates people to consume conspicuously to signal status. However, beyond the desire to signal status, little is known about the positive consequences of conspicuous consumption for the powerless. In this ongoing research, we provide initial evidence that powerless’ acquired status through conspicuous consumption enhances their cognitive abilities.



Citation:

Sumaya AlBaloohsi, Mehrad Moeini-Jazani, Bob M. Fennis, and Luk Warlop (2016) ,"Virtue in Vice: Benefits of Conspicuous Consumption For the Powerless", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 717-717.

Authors

Sumaya AlBaloohsi, BI Norwegian Business School, Norway
Mehrad Moeini-Jazani, BI Norwegian Business School, Norway
Bob M. Fennis, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Luk Warlop, Katholieke University Leuven, Belgium & BI Norwegian Business School, Norway



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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