Juggling When Low in Control: the Effects of Control on Choice to Multitask

Three studies find that incidental feelings of low control lead consumers to multitask more, and that this multitasking subsequently results in lower task performance and well-being. Thus, consumers who are experiencing low perceived control may initiate a downward spiral, whereby they self-select to multi-task, leading to deleterious outcomes.



Citation:

Jerry Han and Susan Broniarczyk (2016) ,"Juggling When Low in Control: the Effects of Control on Choice to Multitask", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 139-144.

Authors

Jerry Han, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Susan Broniarczyk, University of Texas at Austin, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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