Ambivalent Attitudes Do Not Induce Confusion Among Collectivists

People of Asian (vs. European) background perceived context-dependent attitudes as more socially desirable, which led to a higher tendency to evaluate objects both favorably and unfavorably without context. This led to feeling of confusion only for those who did not strongly endorse collectivistic values and when independent self-construal was primed.



Citation:

Andy H. Ng, Sharon Shavitt, and Hazel R. Markus (2016) ,"Ambivalent Attitudes Do Not Induce Confusion Among Collectivists", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 750-750.

Authors

Andy H. Ng, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Sharon Shavitt, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Hazel R. Markus, Stanford University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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