Does Priming a Sense of Powerfulness Encourage Consumers to Buy Healthy Foods?

High (low) power individuals are more likely to buy healthy (tasty) food when the message is baseline, non-assertive; High (low) power individuals are more willing to buy tasty (healthy) food when the message is assertive. The reactance/motivation elicited by the assertiveness of the message is the underlying mechanism.



Citation:

Xin Wang and Jiao Zhang (2016) ,"Does Priming a Sense of Powerfulness Encourage Consumers to Buy Healthy Foods?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 673-674.

Authors

Xin Wang, University of Oregon, USA
Jiao Zhang, University of Oregon, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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