The Paradox of Social Television: the Effects of Connectedness and Distraction on Enjoyment

The use of social media to communicate with other viewers while watching television (social television) can increase or reduce enjoyment. When viewed content is affective, communication creates social connectedness, which enhances the overall experience. When viewed content is informational, social TV hinders the enjoyment of the content due to distraction.



Citation:

Cansu Sogut, Frederic Brunel, Barbara Bickart, and Susan Fournier (2016) ,"The Paradox of Social Television: the Effects of Connectedness and Distraction on Enjoyment", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 628-629.

Authors

Cansu Sogut, Boston University, USA
Frederic Brunel, Boston University, USA
Barbara Bickart, Boston University, USA
Susan Fournier, Boston University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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