Fathers Are Not Like Mothers: How Males and Females Differ in the Effect of Political Identity on Their Children’S Educational Spending

Through four studies, this research examines the effect of parents’ political identity on their spending decision on child’s education. We find that conservatives prefer conformance-style education whereas liberals are more supportive of independent-style education. Further we identify this matching effect differs by individuals’ self-versus other focus.



Citation:

Jihye Jung and Vikas Mittal (2016) ,"Fathers Are Not Like Mothers: How Males and Females Differ in the Effect of Political Identity on Their Children’S Educational Spending ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 740-740.

Authors

Jihye Jung, Rice University, USA
Vikas Mittal, Rice University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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