When Perceiving Low Control Fosters Great Expectations: the Case of Financial Decision Making

This research investigates the impact of incidental personal control threats on outcome expectancies. Results show that control threats paradoxically increase the perceived likelihood for positive outcomes because they heighten individuals’ desire to perceive themselves as competent. Accordingly, the effect strengthens as positive outcomes become more diagnostic of competence.



Citation:

Sean Blair (2016) ,"When Perceiving Low Control Fosters Great Expectations: the Case of Financial Decision Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 396-397.

Authors

Sean Blair, Georgetown University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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