Examination of the Sampling Origin and the Range Hypothesis of Loss Aversion in 50-50 Gamble Settings

We examined the relative sensitivities toward financial losses and gains in 50-50 gamble decision-makings. People are relatively more sensitive to losses when they actively engage with relatively higher gain values by rejecting/accepting them. However, merely seeing, actively thinking about, or subjectively evaluating them does not influence the loss aversion ratio.



Citation:

Minah H. Jung, Clayton R. Critcher, Phoebe Wong, and Leif D. Nelson (2016) ,"Examination of the Sampling Origin and the Range Hypothesis of Loss Aversion in 50-50 Gamble Settings", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 123-127.

Authors

Minah H. Jung, New York University, USA
Clayton R. Critcher, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Phoebe Wong, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Leif D. Nelson, University of California, Berkeley, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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