Choice and Quantity in Conflict: Post-Taste Food Consumption and Inferences of Self-Control

Much research uses observed choices of vice versus virtue foods to make inferences about self-control. This may be misleading because the sensation of taste, post-choice, can greatly influence people’s consumption behaviors. Two experiments demonstrate that trait self-control can have an ironic effect on actual intake of supposedly virtuous choices.



Citation:

Ga-Eun (Grace) Oh and Anirban Mukhopadhyay (2016) ,"Choice and Quantity in Conflict: Post-Taste Food Consumption and Inferences of Self-Control", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 274-278.

Authors

Ga-Eun (Grace) Oh, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Anirban Mukhopadhyay, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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