The Crunch Effect: Food Sound Salience As a Consumption Monitoring Cue

We show that increased attention to the sound the food makes, or food sound salience, may serve as a consumption monitoring cue leading to reduced consumption. Across three studies, we show a consistent negative relationship between the salience of a food’s sound and food intake.



Citation:

Ryan Elder and Gina Mohr (2016) ,"The Crunch Effect: Food Sound Salience As a Consumption Monitoring Cue", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 274-278.

Authors

Ryan Elder, Brigham Young University, USA
Gina Mohr, Colorado State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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