When Having a Trick Up Your Sleeve Is a Bad Thing: Highly Effective Self-Control Strategies Can Be Demotivating

We propose that highly effective self-control strategies can backfire, particularly for individuals low in trait self-control who are, ironically, most in need of help. Evidence from four experiments reveals that a more (vs. less) effective strategy reduces self-control among individuals low in trait self-control by lowering anticipated guilt.



Citation:

Ding (Allen) Tian and Gerald Häubl (2016) ,"When Having a Trick Up Your Sleeve Is a Bad Thing: Highly Effective Self-Control Strategies Can Be Demotivating", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 653-654.

Authors

Ding (Allen) Tian, Wuhan University, China
Gerald Häubl, University of Alberta, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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