Multitasking: Perception and Performance

Previous research has demonstrated the detrimental effects of multitasking on performance. This paper shows that multitasking versus single-tasking is often a matter of perception. That is, the same activity may be framed as multitasking or single-tasking. Across 22 studies, we demonstrate that the mere perception of multitasking improves performance.



Citation:

Shalena Srna, Rom Schrift, and Gal Zauberman (2016) ,"Multitasking: Perception and Performance", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 630-631.

Authors

Shalena Srna, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Rom Schrift, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Gal Zauberman, Yale School of Management, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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