Financial Inability Or Financial Savvy? Subjective Financial Well-Being Shapes Preferences For Discounted Purchases

“Deals” give consumers opportunities to obtain reduced-price purchases, and consumers feeling financially pinched may benefit most from those offers. Yet four lab and field studies show that people feeling poor are less likely to exploit discounts. These effects are attenuated when deal adoption is less likely to signal financial inadequacy.



Citation:

Eesha Sharma and Punam Keller (2016) ,"Financial Inability Or Financial Savvy? Subjective Financial Well-Being Shapes Preferences For Discounted Purchases", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 48-52.

Authors

Eesha Sharma, Dartmouth College, USA
Punam Keller, Dartmouth College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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