Responses to Injustice: Affect, Threats to Social Self-Esteem, and Materialism

Five experiments demonstrate that people become more materialistic when the retributive and distributive justice of their misfortune are both high or both low. These effects are driven by the intention to boost social self-esteem and to eliminate the negative affect that results from the loss of this esteem.



Citation:

Feifei Huang and Robert S. Wyer Jr. (2016) ,"Responses to Injustice: Affect, Threats to Social Self-Esteem, and Materialism", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 737-737.

Authors

Feifei Huang, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Robert S. Wyer Jr., Chinese University of Hong Kong, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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