The Illusion of Processing Fluency on Pro-Social Campaigns: Unjustifiable Efforts Produce Guilty Feelings

This study provides evidences that attitudes in processing pro-social campaigns are moderated by different goals. We found that if one’s goal is dishonorable, putting extra effort into difficult processing fluency (DPF) campaigns causes negative effects. The increase in guilt when dealing with DPF campaigns explains the underlying mechanism.



Citation:

Yaeeun Kim, Yae Ri Kim, Vinod Venkatraman, and Kiwan Park (2016) ,"The Illusion of Processing Fluency on Pro-Social Campaigns: Unjustifiable Efforts Produce Guilty Feelings", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 742-742.

Authors

Yaeeun Kim, Temple University, USA
Yae Ri Kim, Seoul National University, South Korea
Vinod Venkatraman, Temple University, USA
Kiwan Park, Seoul National University, South Korea



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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