Toward an Improved Understanding of the Privacy Paradox

The current research seeks to understand why consumers disclose vast amounts of personal information online despite high concerns of privacy, a phenomenon known as the privacy paradox. We show that consumers’ willingness better predicts their actual disclosure behavior than do behavioral intentions and also which factors influence the situation-specific willingness.



Citation:

Mirja Bues and Wayne D. Hoyer (2016) ,"Toward an Improved Understanding of the Privacy Paradox", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 722-722.

Authors

Mirja Bues, University of Muenster, Gemany
Wayne D. Hoyer, University of Texas at Austin, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

R2. Brand-to-Brand Communications: How Consumers React to Flattery Between Brands

Lingrui Zhou, Duke University, USA
Katherine Crain, Duke University, USA
Keisha Cutright, Duke University, USA

Read More

Featured

The “Upper Limit Framing” Effect: Upper Limit Framing of a Cost Estimate Influences Consumption Choices

Sudipta Mukherjee, Virginia Tech, USA
Frank May, Virginia Tech, USA

Read More

Featured

N5. Mixed Feelings, Mixed Baskets: How Emotions of Pride and Guilt Drive the Relative Healthiness of Sequential Food Choices

Julia Storch, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Koert van Ittersum, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Jing Wan, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.