Emotional Responses to Movie-Trailers Predict Individual Preferences For Movies and Their Population-Wide Commercial Success

Combining neuroscience measurements and machine learning, we extracted the emotional experience from brain activity from subjects viewing movie-trailers. We show that this decoded emotional experience is meaningfully related to the self-reported emotional experience, and that it can be used to predict individual preference, but also commercial success of these movies.



Citation:

Maarten Boksem, Hang-Yee Chan, Vincent Schoots, Alan Sanfey, and Ale Smidts (2016) ,"Emotional Responses to Movie-Trailers Predict Individual Preferences For Movies and Their Population-Wide Commercial Success", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 59-64.

Authors

Maarten Boksem, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Hang-Yee Chan, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Vincent Schoots, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Alan Sanfey, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Ale Smidts, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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