Grip Not to Slip: How Haptic Roughness Leads to Psychological Ownership

In a series of studies, we found that haptic roughness leads to a greater perception of psychological ownership, and longer interactions, compared to smoothness. We conjecture that this is because rougher objects are easier to grip leading to more control, an antecedent of psychological ownership.



Citation:

Bowen Ruan, Joann Peck, Robin Tanner, and Liangyan Wang (2016) ,"Grip Not to Slip: How Haptic Roughness Leads to Psychological Ownership", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 225-230.

Authors

Bowen Ruan, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Joann Peck, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Robin Tanner, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA
Liangyan Wang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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