Word of Mouth Vs. Word of Mouse: the Effect of Communication Channel on Subsequent Reactions to the Brand

Consumers are more likely to invoke the self when discussing a brand orally as compared to writing about it. Consequently, they feel more connected to the brand in the former case. Four studies investigated this effect, its marketing implications and relevant boundary conditions.



Citation:

Hao Shen and Jaideep Sengupta (2016) ,"Word of Mouth Vs. Word of Mouse: the Effect of Communication Channel on Subsequent Reactions to the Brand", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 623-624.

Authors

Hao Shen, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Jaideep Sengupta, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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