The Bright Side to Cuing Consumerism: Consumer Cues Make Individuals With Low Childhood Socioeconomic Status More Prosocial

Counter to extant research that finds consumer cues make people more proself, we present four experiments that demonstrate that consumer cues can actually increase prosociality––at least amongst people who grew up with significant economic constraints (i.e., people with low childhood socioeconomic status).



Citation:

Jodie Whelan and Sean Hingston (2016) ,"The Bright Side to Cuing Consumerism: Consumer Cues Make Individuals With Low Childhood Socioeconomic Status More Prosocial", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 677-678.

Authors

Jodie Whelan, York University, Canada
Sean Hingston, York University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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