Social Class and Social Worlds: Income Affects the Frequency and Nature of Social Contact

Money cues foster self-sufficiency and disinterest in others. We tested income’s effects on social interactions in two studies (N = 116,026). Higher income predicted less time socializing and more time alone. Further, people with greater income spent less time with family and neighbors and more with friends.



Citation:

Kathleen Vohs and Emily Bianchi (2016) ,"Social Class and Social Worlds: Income Affects the Frequency and Nature of Social Contact", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 169-173.

Authors

Kathleen Vohs, University of Minnesota, USA
Emily Bianchi, Emory University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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