Blaming Mcdonald’S: Anthropomorphized Temptation, Failed Self-Control, and Support For Paternalistic Intervention

When facing self-control failure, anthropomorphizing a tempting object (e.g., fast food) increases one’s delegation of responsibility for self-control failure to the object itself and its manufacturer (e.g., fast-food companies). Subsequently, anthropomorphism increases support for paternalistic interventions that impose regulations on the object (e.g., fast-food ban in schools).



Citation:

Julia Hur, Wilhelm Hoffman, and Minjung Koo (2016) ,"Blaming Mcdonald’S: Anthropomorphized Temptation, Failed Self-Control, and Support For Paternalistic Intervention", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 497-498.

Authors

Julia Hur, Northwestern University, USA
Wilhelm Hoffman, University of Cologne
Minjung Koo, Sungkyunkwan University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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