When Originality Backfires: When and Why Conforming Consumers Are Considered Smarter Than Nonconforming Ones

Consumers routinely make inferences about products and other consumers based on purchasing behavior. In this paper, we study the effect of conforming (or nonconforming) consumer behavior on expected product quality and perceived consumer competence.



Citation:

Ignazio Ziano and Mario Pandelaere (2016) ,"When Originality Backfires: When and Why Conforming Consumers Are Considered Smarter Than Nonconforming Ones", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 768-768.

Authors

Ignazio Ziano, University of Ghent, Belgium
Mario Pandelaere, Virginia Tech, USA; University of Ghent, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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