Mental Accounting For Food in Exceptional Contexts

Across five studies, we show that the perceived dietary effect of a food depends on where that food is encountered. People underestimate the impact of calories consumed in exceptional contexts, thus preferring larger portions. Using a mental accounting framework, we suggest errors in both booking and posting drive the effects.



Citation:

Abigail B. Sussman, Adam L. Alter, and Anna Paley (2016) ,"Mental Accounting For Food in Exceptional Contexts", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 174-178.

Authors

Abigail B. Sussman, University of Chicago, USA
Adam L. Alter, New York University, USA
Anna Paley, New York University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

H9. Market Emergence: the Alignment Process of Entrepreneurs’ Socio Cognition and Consumers’ Perception of the Market

Hao Wang, University of South Florida, USA

Read More

Featured

N9. Effects of Awe on Consumers’ Preferences for Bounded Brand Logos

Fei Cao, Renmin University of China
Xia Wang, Renmin University of China

Read More

Featured

J9. The Beautified Me is Me: How Interdependence Increase Usage of Beauty App

Qin Wang, Arizona State University, USA
Andrea Morales, Arizona State University, USA
Adriana Samper, Arizona State University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.