Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (Fnirs): a New Tool For Consumer Research?

As a new method for consumer research our study aims to validate the functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a laboratory experiment. Preliminary results indicate that the fNIRS is indeed a reasonable neuroscientific method to study consumer behaviour.



Citation:

Caspar Krampe, Enrique Strelow, and Peter Kenning (2016) ,"Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (Fnirs): a New Tool For Consumer Research?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 744-744.

Authors

Caspar Krampe, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany
Enrique Strelow, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany
Peter Kenning, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Communicating Limited Financial Resources Increases Perceived Trustworthiness and Interpersonal Connection

Grant E. Donnelly, Harvard Business School, USA
Anne Wilson, Harvard Business School, USA
Ashley V. Whillans, Harvard Business School, USA
Michael Norton, Harvard Business School, USA

Read More

Featured

P2. The Upside of Myopic Loss Aversion

Daniel Wall, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Gretchen Chapman, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Read More

Featured

The Impact of Product Type on Disposal Intentions

MUSTAFA KARATAŞ, Koc University, Turkey
Rabia BAYER, Koc University, Turkey
Zeynep GURHAN-CANLI, Koc University, Turkey

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.