The Role of Implicit Theories in Evaluations of ‘Plus-Size’ Advertising

By examining plus-size female consumers, we demonstrate that not only objective body size, but also implicit beliefs about the malleability of one’s size, affect attitudes toward a product advertised by a plus-size model. These effects are mediated by perceived similarity and arise only for body-relevant products.



Citation:

Melissa Cinelli and Lifeng Yang (2016) ,"The Role of Implicit Theories in Evaluations of ‘Plus-Size’ Advertising", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 417-418.

Authors

Melissa Cinelli, University of Mississippi, USA
Lifeng Yang, University of Mississippi, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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