The Impact of ‘Known Value Item’ (Kvi) Prices on Product Price Perceptions and Expectations

In four experiments, we demonstrate a direct contrast effect and an indirect assimilation effect (mediated by perceived assortment expensiveness) of Known Value Item (KVI) prices on target products’ price expectations and evaluations. We find that the relative strength of contrast versus assimilation depends on assortment size and user status.



Citation:

Frank Goedertier, Bert Weijters, and Karen Gorissen (2016) ,"The Impact of ‘Known Value Item’ (Kvi) Prices on Product Price Perceptions and Expectations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 460-460.

Authors

Frank Goedertier, Vlerick Business School, Belgium
Bert Weijters, Ghent University, Belgium
Karen Gorissen, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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