The Blender Effect: Physical Food State Influences Consumers’ Perceptions and Consumption

Four studies demonstrate that altering the physical state (e.g., solid, semi-solid, liquid) of a food product, a food pictured on a package, or a food on display through mechanical processing (e.g., juicing, blending) influences healthiness perceptions and consumption, a phenomenon we term the blender effect.



Citation:

Courtney Szocs and Sarah Lefebvre (2016) ,"The Blender Effect: Physical Food State Influences Consumers’ Perceptions and Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 648-648.

Authors

Courtney Szocs, Portland State University, USA
Sarah Lefebvre, Universy of Central Florida, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

A Complete Consumer Journey: Tracking Motivation in the Marketplace

Jacob Suher, Portland State University
Szu-chi Huang, Stanford University, USA
Leonard Lee, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Read More

Featured

N7. Emotion Or Information? Effects Of Online Social Support On Customer Engagement

Chuang Wei, Tsinghua University
Maggie Wenjing Liu, Tsinghua University
Qichao Zhu, Tsinghua University

Read More

Featured

Who Gets Credit? Who Gets Blame? The Role of Agency in Ethical Production

Neeru Paharia, Georgetown University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.