The Environmental Impact of Anti-Consumption Lifestyles and Environmentally Concerned Individuals

Our findings indicate that certain anti-consumption lifestyles (i.e., voluntary simplicity and tightwadism) have lower environmental impact than being concerned with the environment, suggesting that resisting consumption offers an alternative way towards more sustainable consumption. Voluntary simplicity has the lowest environmental impact of the lifestyles studied, frugality the highest



Citation:

Maren Ingrid Kropfeld, Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno, and Danilo Dantas (2016) ,"The Environmental Impact of Anti-Consumption Lifestyles and Environmentally Concerned Individuals", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 745-745.

Authors

Maren Ingrid Kropfeld, ESCP Europe, France
Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno, HEC Montreal, Canada
Danilo Dantas, HEC Montreal, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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