Virtue-Vice Or Vice-Virtue: Ingredient Presenting Order Affects Consumer’S Perceived Healthiness and Calorie Estimate

Two experiments demonstrate that consumers report a higher (lower) perceived healthiness and lower (higher) calorie estimate when a dish’s ingredients are presented in a virtue-vice (vice-virtue) sequence. Perceived healthiness mediates the relationship between ingredient order and calorie estimate. However, this effect is weaker for individuals with low appearance self-esteem.



Citation:

Chun-Ming Yang (2016) ,"Virtue-Vice Or Vice-Virtue: Ingredient Presenting Order Affects Consumer’S Perceived Healthiness and Calorie Estimate", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 766-766.

Authors

Chun-Ming Yang, Ming Chuan University, Taiwan



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



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