The Visual Acuity of Less: Why People Underestimate Increases But Not Decreases in Quantity

While we know that quantity increases are strongly underestimated, we find that estimates of quantity decreases are almost perfect. This asymmetry is not caused by loss aversion but by the presence of a natural zero bound which makes downsizing estimation an interpolation task (and supersizing estimation an unbounded extrapolation task).



Citation:

Pierre Chandon and Nailya Ordabayeva (2016) ,"The Visual Acuity of Less: Why People Underestimate Increases But Not Decreases in Quantity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44, eds. Page Moreau, Stefano Puntoni, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 410-411.

Authors

Pierre Chandon, INSEAD, France
Nailya Ordabayeva, Boston College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 44 | 2016



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

The Impact of Product Type on Disposal Intentions

MUSTAFA KARATAŞ, Koc University, Turkey
Rabia BAYER, Koc University, Turkey
Zeynep GURHAN-CANLI, Koc University, Turkey

Read More

Featured

Emotion, Scientific Reasoning, and Judgments of Scientific Evidence

Caitlin Drummond, University of Michigan, USA
Baruch Fischhoff, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Read More

Featured

O7. Helpful Mental Shortcuts or a Shortcut to Bias? Two Perspectives on Heuristics and One New Direction for Consumer Research

Carly Drake, University of Calgary, Canada
Mehdi Mourali, University of Calgary, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.