The Effects of Subjective Probability Estimates on Consumer Evaluation of Advertising Messages

This research investigates the effect of estimated probability on attitudes toward advertisements and behavioral intentions. Results indicate that when individuals estimate that an event is less (more) likely to occur to them, a desirability-focused (feasibility-focused) ad message associated with the event is more persuasive than a feasibility-focused (desirability-focused) ad message.



Citation:

Ohyoon Kwon, Jung-Ah Lee, Eunji Lee, Jangho Moon, and Tae Rang Choi (2015) ,"The Effects of Subjective Probability Estimates on Consumer Evaluation of Advertising Messages ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 794-794.

Authors

Ohyoon Kwon, Department of Advertising and Public Relations, Keimyung University, Korea
Jung-Ah Lee, Department of Psychology , Korea University, Korea
Eunji Lee, Department of Psychology, Korea University, Korea
Jangho Moon, Department of Public Relations & Advertising, Sookmyung University, Korea
Tae Rang Choi, Stan Richards School of Advertising and Public Relations, The University of Texas at Austin



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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