Correspondent Inferences and Consumer Decision Making

We measure individual differences in the tendency to make correspondent inference, i.e., to infer stable dispositions from the behavior of others, and show their impact on blame and guilt attributions, performance evaluations, and investment decisions. Higher accessibility of situational information helps debiasing correspondent inferences.



Citation:

Irene Scopelliti, Carey Morewedge, Lauren Min, Erin McCormick, and Karim Kassam (2015) ,"Correspondent Inferences and Consumer Decision Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 686-687.

Authors

Irene Scopelliti, City University of London, UK
Carey Morewedge, Boston University, USA
Lauren Min, University of Colorado, USA
Erin McCormick, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Karim Kassam, Carnegie Mellon University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

L7. The Joy of Shopping: Reconciling Mixed Effects of Positive Emotions on Shopping Behavior

Kelley Gullo, Duke University, USA
Duncan Simester, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Gavan Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA

Read More

Featured

B3. The Effect of Temporal Distance on Online Reviews’ Recommendation Power: The Role of Spontaneous Retrieval and Perceived Trust

Kyu Ree Kim, Seoul National University
Wujin Chu, Seoul National University

Read More

Featured

Guilt Undermines Consumer Willingness to Buy More Meaningful Time

Ashley V. Whillans, Harvard Business School, USA
Elizabeth W. Dunn, University of British Columbia, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.