Thinking About Financial Deprivation: Rumination and Decision Making Among the Poor

We examine the role of rumination on decision making among the financially poor. Results from two studies suggest that lower-income individuals tend to ruminate more on their financial concerns. Such rumination leads to increased impulsivity and impaired cognitive performance among the poor compared to the well-off.



Citation:

Gita Johar, Rachel Meng, and Keith Wilcox (2015) ,"Thinking About Financial Deprivation: Rumination and Decision Making Among the Poor", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 208-211.

Authors

Gita Johar, Columbia University, USA
Rachel Meng, Columbia University, USA
Keith Wilcox, Columbia University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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