Ensouling Gifts With Closeness

In three studies in which participant-recipients evaluated gifts, we investigated a type of contagion that we refer to as “ensouling” – whereby givers gift something that they also own themselves. We found that ensouling increases recipients’ valuation of gifts, and that it is not owing to feature-quality that recipients may infer.



Citation:

Evan Polman and Sam J. Maglio (2015) ,"Ensouling Gifts With Closeness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 229-233.

Authors

Evan Polman, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Sam J. Maglio, University of Toronto Scarborough, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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