Risk Is Weird

We propose that the presence of unusual mechanisms used to introduce risk, rather than risk itself, is a primary driver of what has been considered “risk aversion.” Even in the absence of uncertainty, participants in four studies valued items in “weird” scenarios less than they did in more straightforward questions.



Citation:

Robert Mislavsky and Uri Simonsohn (2015) ,"Risk Is Weird", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 132-135.

Authors

Robert Mislavsky, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Uri Simonsohn, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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