Is It Always Better to Be a Big Fish in a Little Pond?

We analyzed archival data of 4,005 students’ actual exam scores during their high school in which they had been streamed into high- versus low-ability classes. Results show that being in the high-ability classes can be either academically positive or negative, depending on the nature of the particular comparison.



Citation:

Kao Si and Xianchi Dai (2015) ,"Is It Always Better to Be a Big Fish in a Little Pond? ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 292-296.

Authors

Kao Si, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Xianchi Dai, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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