Entitlement Can Both Decrease and Increase Consumer Susceptibility to Social Influence

Two studies indicate that entitlement—a sense that one deserves special treatment and is exempt from normal social demands—can both buffer and boost consumers’ proneness to social influence. Specifically, study 1 shows that entitlement reduces susceptibility to consistency appeals. Study 2, however, indicates increased susceptibility to certain scarcity appeals.



Citation:

Martine van der Heide, Debra Trampe, Bob Fennis, and Koert van Ittersum (2015) ,"Entitlement Can Both Decrease and Increase Consumer Susceptibility to Social Influence", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 811-811.

Authors

Martine van der Heide, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Debra Trampe, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Bob Fennis, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Koert van Ittersum, University of Groningen, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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