The Rating Polarity Effect: Overcoming the Surreptitious Influence of Implicit Numerical Associations on Consumer Judgments

Can rating polarity (1=bad, 5=good versus 1=good, 5=bad) influence consumer judgments? Four experiments with American and German consumers demonstrate that product evaluations are less sensitive to differences in product quality when using a culturally atypical rating format due to interference between numerical associations in memory. Mindsets mitigate this interference.



Citation:

Ellie Kyung, Manoj Thomas, and Aradhna Krishna (2015) ,"The Rating Polarity Effect: Overcoming the Surreptitious Influence of Implicit Numerical Associations on Consumer Judgments ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 282-286.

Authors

Ellie Kyung, Dartmouth College, USA
Manoj Thomas, Cornell University, USA
Aradhna Krishna, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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