Eating Fast, Risking More: Fast Food Priming and Preference For Risky Options

In two experiments we investigate how exposure to fast food priming influences impulsiveness in choices not related to the eating domain. Study 1 examines how respondents recalling their experiences in a fast food prefer immediate (but smaller) monetary gains. Study 2 extends the effect to diverse and more risky choices.



Citation:

Alessandro Biraglia, Irene Bisignano, Lucia Mannetti, and J. Joško Brakus (2015) ,"Eating Fast, Risking More: Fast Food Priming and Preference For Risky Options", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 777-777.

Authors

Alessandro Biraglia, Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds, United Kingdom
Irene Bisignano, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Italy
Lucia Mannetti, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Italy
J. Joško Brakus, Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds, United Kingdom



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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