Trust Me, I Know! the Impact of Source Self-Enhancement on Persuasion in Word-Of-Mouth

Three studies demonstrate that trust cues impact whether source self-enhancement impedes or enhances recipient persuasion in online word of mouth. Self-enhancement increases (decreases) persuasion in the presence of a positive (negative) trust cue. Heightened recipient perceptions of source expertise mediate the effect at high (but not low) trust.



Citation:

Grant Packard, Andrew Gershoff, and David Wooten (2015) ,"Trust Me, I Know! the Impact of Source Self-Enhancement on Persuasion in Word-Of-Mouth", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 197-202.

Authors

Grant Packard, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada
Andrew Gershoff, University of Texas at Austin, USA
David Wooten, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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