Divine Intervention: How Illusory Causal Perception Reduces Consumer Punishment After Bad Things Happen to Bad Firms

Consumers’ desire to punish a transgressor firm can decrease if the firm had also suffered an unrelated loss. Experiments demonstrate that, for individuals with accessible religious beliefs, arbitrary similarities between the transgression and loss trigger causal perception that the loss was a punishment, lowering their desire to harm the firm.



Citation:

Jae-Eun Namkoong, Jerry (Jisang) Han, and Andrew Gershoff (2015) ,"Divine Intervention: How Illusory Causal Perception Reduces Consumer Punishment After Bad Things Happen to Bad Firms", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 647-648.

Authors

Jae-Eun Namkoong, University of Nevada Reno, USA
Jerry (Jisang) Han, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Andrew Gershoff, University of Texas at Austin, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

I10. Can Body Size Influence the Judgments of Warmth and Competence?

Trang Thanh Mai, University of Manitoba, Canada
Olya Bullard, University of Winnipeg
Luming Wang, University of Manitoba, Canada

Read More

Featured

Pangs from Persuasion: When Recommendations Undermine Consumers’ Social Worth

Suzanne Galia Rath, Queens University, Canada
Laurence Ashworth, Queens University, Canada
Nicole Robitaille, Queens University, Canada

Read More

Featured

I11. Self-Presentation in the Mating Market: The Influence of Gender and Sexual Orientation on Profiles on Tinder and Grindr

Chaim Kuhnreich, Concordia University, Canada
Lilian Carvalho, FGV/EAESP
Gad Saad, Concordia University, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.