The Revision Bias: Preferences For Revised Experiences Absent Objective Improvement

Three experiments demonstrate a “revision bias” – people prefer experiences and products that have been revised over time, independent of objective improvements over predecessors. This effect holds even when less total effort was devoted to revised versions relative to beta versions.



Citation:

Leslie K. John and Michael I. Norton (2015) ,"The Revision Bias: Preferences For Revised Experiences Absent Objective Improvement", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 244-248.

Authors

Leslie K. John, Harvard Business School, USA
Michael I. Norton, Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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