The Effects of Omitting-Then-Revealing Product Attribute Information: an Information Revelation Effect

Three experiments investigate the evaluative effect of revealing previously omitted information. In short, attributes were weighed more heavily when omitted-then-revealed (versus not omitted). Additionally, this revelation effect was mediated by changes in affect toward the product and bounded to those open (versus resistant) to change. The implications are discussed.



Citation:

Scott Wright, Joshua Clarkson, and Frank Kardes (2015) ,"The Effects of Omitting-Then-Revealing Product Attribute Information: an Information Revelation Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 742-743.

Authors

Scott Wright, Providence College, USA
Joshua Clarkson, University of Cincinnati, USA
Frank Kardes, University of Cincinnati, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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