Getting Credit For Csr: When Money Doesn’T Talk

We hypothesize that people ascribe charitable credit differently for firms versus individuals. In a series of experiments, we find that firms receive less credit for giving money than for giving tangible goods, whereas the opposite is true for individuals. The role of authenticity appears to be key.



Citation:

Rachel Gershon and Cynthia Cryder (2015) ,"Getting Credit For Csr: When Money Doesn’T Talk", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 786-786.

Authors

Rachel Gershon, Washington University, USA
Cynthia Cryder, Washington University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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