Getting Credit For Csr: When Money Doesn’T Talk

We hypothesize that people ascribe charitable credit differently for firms versus individuals. In a series of experiments, we find that firms receive less credit for giving money than for giving tangible goods, whereas the opposite is true for individuals. The role of authenticity appears to be key.



Citation:

Rachel Gershon and Cynthia Cryder (2015) ,"Getting Credit For Csr: When Money Doesn’T Talk", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 786-786.

Authors

Rachel Gershon, Washington University, USA
Cynthia Cryder, Washington University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

In Pursuit of Imperfection: How Flawed Products Can Reveal Valuable Process Information

Erin P Carter, University of Maine
Peter McGraw, University of Colorado, USA

Read More

Featured

Trust the Polls? Neural and Recall Responses Provide Alternative Predictors of Political Outcomes

Samuel B Barnett, Northwestern University, USA
Andres Campero, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Ronen Zilberman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Chris Rose, New York University, USA
Aaron Robinson, Northwestern University, USA
Moran Cerf, Northwestern University, USA

Read More

Featured

Green Biases: Consumer Evaluations of Renewable and Non-Renewable Energy Sources

Nathan Dhaliwal, University of British Columbia, Canada
David Hardisty, University of British Columbia, Canada
Jiaying Zhang, University of British Columbia, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.