The Controlled Nature of Prosociality: Pharmacological Enhancement of Prosocial Behavior

Considerable debate exists regarding the extent to which prosocial actions are a product of automatic or controlled processes. We addressed this question by pharmacologically enhancing cognitive control mechanisms via the drug tolcapone. Our results argue that controlled, as opposed to automatic, processes, enable prosocial behavior.



Citation:

Ming Hsu, Ignacio Sáez, and Andrew Kayser (2015) ,"The Controlled Nature of Prosociality: Pharmacological Enhancement of Prosocial Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 170-175.

Authors

Ming Hsu, University of California Berkeley, USA
Ignacio Sáez, University of California Berkeley, USA
Andrew Kayser, University of California Berkeley, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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