The Reverse Underdog Effect

The underdog brand positioning may not always work positively. The present research finds that the negative consequence of the underdog effect is more pronounced when ethical transgressions take place as opposed to the functional transgressions. More importantly, perceived betrayal is the underlying process that results in negative attitudes toward brand.



Citation:

Kiwan Park and Yae Ri Kim (2015) ,"The Reverse Underdog Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 801-801.

Authors

Kiwan Park, Seoul National University, Korea
Yae Ri Kim, Seoul National University, Korea



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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