The Reverse Underdog Effect

The underdog brand positioning may not always work positively. The present research finds that the negative consequence of the underdog effect is more pronounced when ethical transgressions take place as opposed to the functional transgressions. More importantly, perceived betrayal is the underlying process that results in negative attitudes toward brand.



Citation:

Kiwan Park and Yae Ri Kim (2015) ,"The Reverse Underdog Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 801-801.

Authors

Kiwan Park, Seoul National University, Korea
Yae Ri Kim, Seoul National University, Korea



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

O2. The Streaking Star Effect: Why People Want Individual Winning Streaks to Continue More than Group Streaks

Jesse Walker, Cornell University, USA
Thomas Gilovich, Cornell University, USA

Read More

Featured

The “Upper Limit Framing” Effect: Upper Limit Framing of a Cost Estimate Influences Consumption Choices

Sudipta Mukherjee, Virginia Tech, USA
Frank May, Virginia Tech, USA

Read More

Featured

Unintended Customer Consequences of Corporate Lobbying

Gautham Vadakkepatt, George Mason University
Kelly Martin, Colorado State University
Neeru Paharia, Georgetown University, USA
Sandeep Arora, University of Manitoba, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.