How Squeeze Tubes Affect Consumption Volume

Convenient packagings have been increasingly added to product assortments. Two studies show that consumers use less of a product when it comes in a squeeze tube versus a traditional container. A third study shows that the ease of consumption monitoring drives the effect which is more prominent for unrestrained eaters.



Citation:

Elke Huyghe, Maggie Geuens, and Iris Vermeir (2015) ,"How Squeeze Tubes Affect Consumption Volume", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 567-568.

Authors

Elke Huyghe, Ghent University, Belgium
Maggie Geuens, Ghent University, Belgium
Iris Vermeir, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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